When it comes to supercells, the most common type is likely the high-precipitation (HP) supercell.

While supercells are the most uncommon storm type, they are responsible for an outsized portion of severe weather compared to other types of storms in the U.S. 

HP supercells are particularly difficult to deal with because they have a wet rear-flank downdraft. This wall of rain and hail, personified by a thick hook or appendage with a storm on radar, obscures the view of a tornado approaching an area from the south and east (often north and east as well).

This is what makes HP supercells so dangerous to observe and so frustrating as well. With the rain wrapping around the area of rotation, you can’t actually see what’s going on from a distance and any shot of seeing a tornado in these types of cells has to come from a dangerous position known as the bear’s cage to the north of the potential tornado.

An HP supercell has all of the parts you would expect from a supercell from an updraft base, to a low level mesocyclone, to a forward-flank downdraft (FFD), and rear-flank downdraft (RFD). Every supercell is made up of these basic parts, but how they appear and behave determines what type of supercell you are dealing with.

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When it comes to supercells, the most common type is most likely the HP Supercell. While supercells are the most uncommon storm type, they are responsible for an outsized portion of severe weather compared to other types of storms in the U.S. HP Supercells are particularly difficult to deal with because they have a wet rear-flank downdraft. This wall of rain and hail, personified by a thick hook or appendage with a storm on radar, obscures the view of a tornado approaching an area from the south and east (and oftentimes north and east as well). This is what makes HP supercells so dangerous to observe and so frustrating as well. With the rain wrapping around the area of rotation, you can’t actually see what’s going on from a distance and any shot of seeing a tornado in these types of cells has to come from a dangerous position known as the bear’s cage to the north of the potential tornado. An HP supercell has all of the parts you would expect from a supercell from an updraft base, to a low level meso, to a forward-flank downdraft, and rear-flank downdraft. As with most supercells the chief hail core will be in the FFD just to the north (or left as the storm is moving) of the updraft. In this instance, the chief hail core of the storm is to the right behind the fence in the teal area. The RFD is wrapping around the area of rotation in the center of the frame and you can see the inflow into the storm from this vantage point as well. #storm #weather #sky #nature #instaweather #instanature #natureza #instaweatherpro #stormchasing #thunderstorm #stormysky #stormy #skylovers #igsky #video #atmosphere #science #badweather #stormyweather #naturelovers #instanature #greatplains #stormchasers #tornadoalley #thunderstorm #tornado #lightning

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As with most supercells the chief hail core will be in the FFD just to the north (or left as the storm is moving) of the updraft. In this instance, the chief hail core of the storm is to the right behind the fence in the teal area.

The RFD is wrapping around the area of rotation in the center of the frame and you can see the inflow into the storm from this vantage point as well.