Every now and then, a day comes along that surprises you so much that you can’t help but just feel a bit of shock. The extremely photogenic and long-lasting tornado of March 8, 2010 from near Elk City, OK to Hammon, OK was one of those days — where it all came together just enough to produce what was a very memorable day.

Days like Hammon are far from the norm when it comes to low risk days. What usually happens is a fluke happens on a day like Hammon and then for years afterwards chasers will go and chase questionable setups and say it looks like the day in question — when in reality a lot of flukish things had to come together for the even in question to even happen.

By all accounts, Hammon had an outflow boundary, some major cold-air advection up top, and just enough sunshine in the afternoon to steepen low level lapse rates to make the atmosphere unstable.

While the Hammon tornado is a memorable day in most every respect, it certainly was a fluke — but one I was glad to have been aggressive enough in chasing to have documented.